Connect with us

Lifestyle

‘Sigiya Ngolwethu’ Nkayi author pens a Zimsec setbook novel

Published

on

BY NOKUTHABA DLAMINI

A Nkayi man has set himself on a mission to revive the Ndebele language through storytelling which has seen one of his novels being selected as Zimbabwe Schools Examination Council (Zimsec) setbooks. 

Advertisement

Born in 1982, Zibusiso Lima says he developed passion for story telling while doing his education at Dimpamiwa Primary School and Hlangabeza High School in Nkayi, Matabeleland North Province where he used to score good marks in fiction writing.

He says he began exploring his talent in 1998 when he was doing his form three. 

“I am a writer who aims to revive the Ndebele language,”Lima said in an interview with VicFallsLive 

Advertisement

“I write fiction  based on what’s happening  in the world around us today. 

“I used to score good marks in Ndebele compositions so this coupled with my passion for reading Ndebele novels by the time, compelled me to explore more about this industry.”

Lima recently published his first book titled, ‘Kodwa mama!’ being recognised by the Zimsec as a literature prose set book for November 2024 to November 2026.

Advertisement

 

“Other than Kodwa mama!, I have co-authored anthologies of poetry titled Sigiya ngolwethu, Izwi lezimbongi and short stories titled Izigigaba zakwaNdongaziyaduma,” Lima revealed. 

Lima says he drew his  inspiration from the late veteran author Ndabezinhle S. Sigogo and before his passing, he encouraged him to do more in preserving the Ndebele language. 

Advertisement

” I vividly remember the day I met him at his Tshabalala home in Bulawayo, he encouraged me to do more,” Lima said. 

“Ngiyajabula ukubona intsha isukuma iqedisa umsebenzi esawuqalayo. Ibambeni kanjalo, kithi selingomtsha wendoda. (I am happy to see the younger generation taking up what we started, even if our time is up, it is up to you to you continue with the work) those were his last  his words.”

Kodwa mama! brings a lesson about faithfulness and honesty, particularly required of women to their partners to avoid broken marriages. 

Advertisement

Lima says through his works, his wish is to inspire youths to utilize their  their leasure time doing something that is productive.

“For a living, I am employed by one of the companies in South Africa and doing most of my writing during my spare time,”

“Driven by the passion to revive our indigenous languages, it is my major aim to see more upcoming authors being assisted in realising their dream. In this regard i desire to own a publishing house which will play a major role in realising this dream.” 

Advertisement

 

Lima’s book will soon be found in Bulawayo and those intending to place orders can reach him on email at zibusisolima7@gmail.com and through phone on +263 77 685 3163/ +263713736072 for calls and +27731268684 for WhatsApp. 

 

Advertisement

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Lifestyle

Love, peace, and harmony: The Ubuntu Bomuntu story

Published

on

By

BY STAFF REPORTER

Nokuthaba Dlamini , managing editor of VicFallsLive, sat down with Sibangilizwe Sibanda co-founder of the traditional Imbube Acappella group, Ubuntu Bomuntu, to discuss their journey and music in a modernizing world. The Victoria Falls-based group recently launched their seven-track album, Umdla Nkunzi, which features their gospel song, Inkanyezi, and other tracks that celebrate Ndebele culture and values.

Advertisement

Interview:

Q: Can you introduce yourselves and share how Ubuntu Bomuntu was formed?

A: We were formed in June 1999 as Amahlosi Asendle, but later changed our name to Ubuntu Bomuntu due to pronunciation difficulties. We’re a group of eight members from Matabeleland North province.

Advertisement

Q: What inspired you to start performing traditional music, and what’s the significance of your group’s name?

A: We were inspired by local Matebeleland Acappella groups and our cultural identity. Our name, Ubuntu Bomuntu, means humanity and emphasizes our focus on teaching and preserving our culture.

Q: What type of traditional music do you perform, and what’s its history?

Advertisement

A: We specialize in Imbube (African Acappella), which originated in Matebeleland, Zimbabwe, South Africa, and Eswatini. This music style is unique to our region and plays a significant role in preserving our cultural heritage.

Q: How do you believe your music contributes to the preservation and promotion of our community’s cultural heritage?

A: Our music teaches the young ones about our culture, and our recorded materials serve as a reminder of our roots. We aim to prevent cultural loss and promote our identity.

Advertisement

Q: What’s your experience been like performing for tourists and visitors in Victoria Falls?

A: It’s a privilege to perform for tourists daily, showcasing our culture to a global audience.

Q: How do you engage with your audience, and what do you hope they take away from your performances?

Advertisement

A: We use social media to connect with our audience worldwide. Our goal is to educate them about our culture and promote love, peace, and harmony.

Q: Can you share the meaning and stories behind some of your popular songs?

A: We have gospel songs like Inkanyezi, social songs, and songs addressing issues like drug abuse, marriage, and climate change.

Advertisement

Our music reflects our culture and the world around us. For instance Esigodlweni , is a thanksgiving song that celebrates the culture and values of the Ndebele people from the founding King Mzilikazi kaMatshobana.

Q: What traditional instruments do you use, and how are they significant to your music?

A: We use African drums like ingungu for certain dances, but primarily focus on vocal performances.

Advertisement

Q: What challenges have you faced as a traditional musical group in a modernizing community?

A: Some people view our music as non-commercial, and promotion is limited, even on local airwaves.

Q: What are your goals for Ubuntu Bomuntu, and how do you see your music evolving in the future?

Advertisement

A: We aim to uplift our music to international standards and maintain our cultural identity. We’re focused on a brighter future.

Conclusion:

 

Advertisement

Q: What message would you like to share with our community and visitors through your music?

A: Love, peace, and harmony – that’s what we’re all about.

Q: Are there any upcoming performances or projects you’d like to promote?

Advertisement

A: We have several projects in the works, but lack of funds has delayed recording. We look forward to sharing our music with the world.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Lifestyle

Gilmore Tee makes it to the Forty under 40 Africa list

Published

on

By

BY OWN CORRESPONDENT

Global Citizen, Curator, Forbes 30 Alumni and Media Practitioner – Gilmore Tee made the Forty under 40 Africa List for 2023, alongside some outstanding personalities such as BBc’s Nyasha Michelle, South Africa’s Yershen Pillay, Vumile Msweli and Algeria’s Toumiat Lakhdar.

Advertisement

Gilmore is known for his works with Paper Bag Africa which houses the PAN African lifestyle and cross-networking event – The PiChani, European Film Festival Zimbabwe, I Wear My Culture and eMoyeni Digital Storytelling.

The 33-year-old is known for his work in the creative industry and brands such as Jameson, Fastjet, Food Lovers Market, GQ South Africa and Glamour Magazine.

Earlier this year the organisers of the Forty under 40 Africa initiative, Xodus Communications Limited, shortlisted 126 nominees from 24 African countries. The initiative is aimed at recognizing and celebrating emerging leaders under the age of 40 who demonstrate or impact personally and/ or professionally through their exceptional leadership.

Advertisement

The personalities nominated this year cut across countries such as; South Africa, Egypt, Zimbabwe, Uganda, Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, Tanzania, Cameroon, South Sudan, Morocco, Benin, Mauritius, Algeria, Swaziland, Sierra Leone, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Algeria, Botswana, Tunisia, Eswatini, Lesotho and Gambia.

At the event which was held on the March 25 at the Leonardo Hotel in Sandton City, South Africa, Gilmore was announced as a winner and part of the 40 lists, alongside other 39 outstanding practitioners from across the African continent.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Lifestyle

Across Zimbabwe, British scones are the taste of home

Published

on

By

HARARE – A sweet doughy treat from Britain has become a beloved part of Zimbabwe’s national cuisine, where despite the country’s colonial past, mothers and chefs alike now claim the pastry as their own.

The scone, which Brits normally enjoy with afternoon tea, is ubiquitous in Harare, the southern African country’s capital.

Advertisement

A breakfast favourite in these parts, it can be found everywhere from high-end eateries to the market stalls of impoverished townships.

“We love scones. They are not British, they are ours, our local scones,” Nyari Mashayamombe, a rights activist, says as she leaves an upmarket restaurant in Harare’s Belgravia district, its garden dotted with open umbrellas

Dense yet airy, Zimbabwean scones are the result of the intercultural mix that came with colonisation, says Mashayamombe, a red-haired 42-year-old who is also a singer and media personality.

Advertisement

In “fancy places like here… a beautiful scone goes as high as six bucks,” she said, referring to the American dollars that have become Zimbabwe’s parallel and preferred currency.

“It’s worth it.”

A few kilometres away at a market in Harare’s oldest township of Mbare, scones are impossible to find after midday.

Advertisement

“We sold them all this morning. They move quickly,” one vendor says.

 

The main communal bakery in Mbare, a bustling working-class district, opens at dawn.

Advertisement

Tawanda Mutyakureva, 26, arrives at around five in the morning to his work station, measuring two square metres, where he has to bend over to spread the dough on a knee-height countertop.

Every day he cranks out around 200 scones in an overheated room with cinder-block walls, lit by two bulbs hanging from a wire.

Brandishing a cookie cutter, he works quickly to whip out one batch after another, with each scone selling for 25 American cents.

Advertisement

In the hot, humid atmosphere redolent of yeast, his wife – with their baby strapped to her back – helps him with buttering the pastries and clearing plates.

Resellers come in to buy 10 or 20 pieces that will be sold at small grocery stores.

Memory Mutero, 46, was at the bakery to buy bread, since she makes her own scones at home.

Advertisement

“I make scones for my three kids. It takes about 45 minutes,” she tells AFP.

Her ingredients are simple: flour, salt, yeast, sugar, butter and milk.

But at the Bottom Drawer, an upscale tearoom in Harare, cook Veronica Makonese is unimpressed after tasting a scone brought back from the township.

Advertisement

“There is no milk in those, they used water!” the 46-year-old claims.

A white kerchief on her head, Makonese says she makes her own buttermilk for her scones, to control temperature and acidity levels, and uses only real butter to ensure the proper taste and softness.

Her boss, Sarah Macmillan, a 53-year-old Zimbabwean, says she longs for the scones she would eat as a child.

Advertisement

Back then, two shops in the centre of Harare, now closed, competed for the crown of best scone in the country, and Macmillan wanted her tearoom to make some that are “just as good”.

Macmillan says the secret of the little cake’s enduring success, in a country struggling with endemic poverty, is simple: “It’s very filling and affordable.” – AFP

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2022 VicFallsLive. All rights reserved, powered by Advantage